NEWS FROM FEAD

FEAD is the European Federation representing the European waste management industry. FEAD’s members are national waste management associations covering 18 EU Member States, Serbia and Norway. They have an approximate 60% share in the household waste market and handle more than 75% of industrial and commercial waste in Europe.
FEAD represents about 3000 companies with activities in all forms of waste management. These companies employ over 320000 people who operate around 2400 recycling and sorting centres, 1100 composting sites, 260 waste-to-energy plants and 900 controlled landfills. They play an important role in the determination of the best environmental option for waste management problems.

FEAD is the European Federation representing the European waste management industry

NEWS FROM FEAD

FEAD is the European Federation representing the European waste management industry.
FEAD's members are national waste management associations covering 19 EU Member States and Norway. They have an approximate 60% share in the household waste market and handle more than 75% of industrial and commercial waste in Europe and heir combined annual turnover is approximately € 75 billion.
FEAD represents about 3000 companies with activities in all forms of waste management. These companies employ over 320000 people who operate around 2400 recycling and sorting centres, 1100 composting sites, 260 waste-to-energy plants and 900 controlled landfills. They play an important role in the determination of the best environmental option for waste management problems.
From July 2014, FEAD has a new president, Mr. David Palmer-Jones, which is Chief Executive Officer of SITA UK, Maidenhead, UK.

As a Chief executive officer, SITA Mr. David Palmer-Jones published essays on energy to waste, The Energy from Waste, Essays "Through provoking analysis from industry leaders".

The main ideas of the essays are presented below.

"The past decades have seen a seismic shift in the way waste has been perceived in Europe. The first policy wave dates back to the 1970s, with directives emphasizing responsible end-of-pipe management of waste, and environmental protection. Following tentative moves in the 1980s, the 1990s saw a more concerted drive towards policies driving recovery and recycling.
In 2013 the Commission organized the cross-sector European Resource Efficiency Platform (EREP) and European Innovation Partnership (EIP) to develop appropriate policy ideas. Central to EREP's policy recommendations (also endorsed by the EIP) is for the EU "to promote resource efficiency and move to a circular economy" - a transition championed in particular by Janez Potočnik, the outgoing Environment Commissioner.
This year sees the culmination of this process with a package of measures around the circular economy.

The gist of what the package is likely to contain has been trailed by the Commission in its draft Communication Towards a Circular Economy - A Zero Waste Programme for Europe:

  • an aspirational headline resource efficiency improvement target of 30% by 2030;
  • raising the municipal waste reuse and recycling target from its present level of 50% to 70% by 2030, and raising the recycling targets in the Packaging Directive;
  • cutting food waste by 30% by 2030;
  • by 2025 banning the landfill of recyclable waste, and by 2030 extending the ban to all recoverable(including energy recovery) municipal waste;
  • limiting energy recovery to nonreusable and non-recyclable waste;
  • promoting a "smörgasbord" of supporting policy measures such as extended producer responsibility;
  • revision of the Ecodesign Directive, economic instruments and green public procurement.

Overall, the 7th EAP emphasizes the need "to move towards a lifecycle-driven circular economy, with a cascading use of resources and residual waste that is close to zero."
Thus the 7th EAP has set the stage for a mid- (2020-2030) to long-term (2050) vision for Europe's economy, which the draft Communication has further elaborated.

 

And what of waste to energy?

Commissioner Potočnik has stated that in his view WtE "can be part of a balanced waste management policy particularly where high coefficients of energy recovery are achieved".
With the ultimate aim of minimizing residual waste, the overall balance in the draft Communication is tilted firmly in the direction of reuse and recycling.
That could mean a strategic re-think as to how future EU incineration capacity projections should be reconciled with present capacity, which is unevenly distributed between Member States - some with over-capacity and some with under-or no capacity.
Clearly, challenging landfill diversion targets do not in themselves result in landfill diversion. Sound national strategic plans, robust regulatory structures and a balanced suite of policy instruments to support markets and end-users are necessary prerequisites.
For our sector, (waste management) three strands surrounding the Commission's package are likely to dominate discussions at EU level: the speed of transition to a zero-landfill future, growing an internal market for recyclates and energetic waste materials, and the challenge of financing new facilities that will be required to recover reusable materials.

The first issue reflects widely different waste management practices within the EU. With respect to meeting the current waste-related targets, the Commission identified no fewer than 12 Member States as having the largest implementation gap with the Landfill and Waste Directives - being "highly dependent on landfilling, other treatment options [being] rarely in place". A further five "average performing" Member States also relied heavily on landfilling, lacking alternative treatment infrastructure or enabling policies to drive waste up the hierarchy.
Turning to financing, the delivery of alternative waste management infrastructure requires considerable capital investment.

Across the EU, BioIS estimated that annual capital of €42.9bn will be required till 2020 for full implementation of the current waste Acquis. Marginal costs tend to rise disproportionately relative to landfill diversion and recycling targets, so it is expected that financing the new facilities will become even more challenging.
Unless financing (and our respective planning regimes) can deliver infrastructure that is in step with the pace of landfill diversion, improvements foreseen by the circular economy will fail to materialize. The draft communication is only the first step in a long road towards a circular economy strategy. Nevertheless, the broad contours of how it might impact our sector are becoming apparent, providing ample food for thought as to how we should align our sector to service the EU economy's future needs."

More information are available on:  fead.be .

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